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Akan Tradition in America

Although Africa is a vast continent which houses many nations of peoples, there is a continent-wide uniformity in the ideas, values and practices of the African Traditional Religion.  The most distinctive feature of African Traditional Religion is that it is a way of life.  It is the African belief that religion gives order to their lives by giving man an understanding of himself and his relationship with his fellowman and his environment.  At the root of religion is a quest for harmony between man, the spiritual world, nature and society.

The Akom

The Akans religious service practiced in America by the Onipa-Abusia and by the Akans of Ghana, West Africa is a time when the community of families pay homage to the Abosum and Nsamanfo, the Gods and Ancestors. In the language of our ancestors, Twi, Akom means possession. Once a priest is in this state, it is called Akom.  The Akom can occur anytime or any place. Our holy days, days which we hold sacred to the Abosom, are Sunday, Tuesday and Friday.  A priest is especially susceptible to possess on one of the three holy days.  Click here for more information on weekly Akoms.
Onipa Abusia incorporates all aspects of the Akan customs and culture such as the Edin Toa – Naming Ceremony, the Aweregye -Marriage Ceremony, the Ye Gore Bra – Puberty Rites, the Ayie – Funeral Rites, Akom – religious service, as well as the celebrating of the 42 day Akwasiadae for the Nsamanfo and annual festivals celebrating the Abosum.

Nana says, “Anywhere you are you should always try to control your own destiny.”